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Posts Tagged ‘global justice’

A Time to Conspire: The Copenhagen Moment

In environmental justice, indigenous communities, intellectual freedom, public policy, racial justice, social movements on December 7, 2009 at 7:20 am

Magazine CoverThe new issue of Left Turn magazine is out with an important article about this week’s convergence in Copenhagen by my colleague Gopal Dayaneni. Here’s a preview.

Movement Generation Justice and Ecology Project

“Imagine waking up on December 1, 1999, and learning about the World Trade Organization for the first time, as a left organizer, by watching it fall apart on television. You’d probably be thinking to yourself, “Why didn’t I know about that?” or “This is a very different political moment,” or “Wow, things might really be changing.”

The potential for such a political moment is once again upon us, ten years after the collapse of the WTO in Seattle. From December 7-18, 2009, the 15th Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change will be meeting in Copenhagen to forge a post-Kyoto climate policy that substantially reduces atmospheric concentrations of heat-trapping greenhouse gasses, while addressing the certainty that many consequences of climate destabilization are coming and will disproportionately impact the poor. The UNFCCC will also see the massive convergence of social movements, indigenous peoples and vulnerable nations from around the world.

This meeting in Copenhagen should not be thought of as being about climate or carbon. It is about everything: international trade, forests, food and agriculture, the rights of indigenous, land-based and forest peoples, resource privatization, international finance (both private and public), development rights, oceans, technology, intellectual property, migration, displacement and refugees, health, wealth, poverty, the future of human settlements, and biodiversity, to name just a few.

We all have a lot at stake. …”

Read the rest at LeftTurn.org

Or, read Movement Generation’s live blog from Copenhagen.

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Global Justice Values in Librarianship from Bibliotek i Samhälle

In information access, intellectual freedom, library associations, social movements on December 16, 2008 at 7:45 am

Bibliotek i Samhälle (Libraries in Society) is a socialist library organization in Sweden founded in 1969. You can read more about them, or join their listserv here. Their platform for global justice librarianship is reposted below (Just call it my way of celebrating the 60th Anniversary of the Declaration of Human Rights last Wednesday, 12/10):

1. We shall work towards an international agenda as the basis of common action of librarians everywhere actively committed, as librarians, to social justice, equality, human welfare, and the development of cultural democracy.

2. We will unite librarians and information workers in opposition to the marketization of public goods, to privatization of social resources and to outsourcing of services and will oppose international treaties and institutions which advance destructive neo-liberal policies.

3. We insist upon the equality of access to and inclusiveness of information services, especially extending such services to the poor, marginalized and discriminated against, including the active solidarity-based provision of information assistance to these groups and their advocates in their struggles.

4. We shall encourage the exploration of alternative models of human services; promote and disseminate critical analysis of information technology’s impact on libraries and societies; and support the fundamental democratization of existing institutions of education, culture, communications.

5. We shall undertake joint, interdisciplinary research into fundamental library issues (e.g. into the political economy of information in the age of neo-liberalism and corporate globalization) in order to lay the basis for effective action in our spheres of work.

6. We will support cooperative collection, organization and preservation of the documents of people’s struggles and the making available of alternative materials representing a wide range of progressive viewpoints often excluded as resources from the debates of our times.

7. We will investigate and organize efforts to make the library-as-workplace more democratic and encourage resistance to the managerialism of the present library culture.

8. We will lead in promoting international solidarity among librarians and cooperation between libraries across borders on the basis of our joint commitment to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and related covenants which create a democratic framework for constructive cooperative endeavours.

9. We will organize in common with other cultural and educational progressives, to help put issues of social responsibility on the agendas of international bodies such as IFLA and UNESCO.

10. We shall oppose corporate globalization which, despite its claims, reinforces existing social, economic, cultural inequalities, and insist on a democratic globalism and internationalism which respects and cultivates cultural plurality, which recognizes the sovereignty of peoples, which acknowledges the obligations of society to the individual and communities, and which prioritizes human values and needs over profits.